Are you wanting to start an anthology and work out a system for the writers to take an active role in the production, sales, and promotion so it’s not just about the writing? Are you wondering what “jobs” there are when writing an anthology? Would you like ways to celebrate your success as a group?

It’s not just about the writing…trust me :0)

Anthologies take a village to put together and with everyone taking on a specific job can help the process be fun, engaging, productive, and successful. I posted an article on why write an anthology in the first place and how to choose a great organization that you may want to check out.

For this week’s article, I want to share why it’s not just about the writing

I will narrow it down to the following points to consider:

1. Who does what in your group of authors.

2. Why it’s important to set timelines.

3. Decide how to carry out communications with each other.

4. Create time for celebration.

There are more considerations, and it depends on the general personality of the group.

But let’s look at it more closely 

1.     Who does what in your group of authors–

I have been involved with various types of groups from management, fundraising, and now authors writing for the greater good. The groups that have had longevity are the groups that determine who does what to get a job done and understand it not just about the writing. This might not be apparent when you are getting started, but once you “get going” with projects it is beneficial to be clear on who is responsible for each task. Also, it is important to leave room for flexibility—just in case there is a roadblock in getting a particular task completed and someone needs to step in to help.

2.     Why it’s important to set timelines-

I think this one is self-explanatory. If a group of creatives get together and there are no timelines…Yeee-ha…chaos is close by. If there are no deadlines…it’s tough to get a job done and get a book published. And since the group I am in is super great with timelines, we are getting things done by our deadlines and we are uber organized. Plus, it also sets a tone of professionalism with the organization you are working with if you decided to donate any royalties.

3.     Decide how to carry out communications with each other–

Luckily, we have Facebook, Zoom, and other implements that make it easy to communicate. Working things out with other authors sometimes requires more than emails and Facebook posts. Working groups on Zoom are a significant way to plan a series, decide who is doing what job, discussing timelines, etc.

4.     Create a time for celebration–

Hmmmm, that sounds like a virtual party—doesn’t it? Why not? It’s a lot of work putting together an anthology and you know that cliché…”All work and no play…makes a group of anthology writers boring.” When you launch your book and you are making the dough…it’s time to celebrate.

Speaking of launch

How about helping The Cool Fiction Writers Club with our recent book! Wings of Prophecy. The net royalties goes to Vermont Institute of Natural Science for raptor rehabilitation. We also have another YA fiction called Winds of Winter. The net royalties for this book goes to SaveACatRescue.org

Finally…

There are a lot of things to consider with the points and tasks I raised. Good luck with your group when figuring out your purpose, goals, and tasks. If you keep in mind it’s not just about the writing you will succeed, be productive, and have fun with the journey.

Books by Wendy Van de Poll

Wendy Van de Poll is a twelve-time best-selling author on Amazon. The genre’s she writes in are pet entrepreneurship, pet loss, children’s picture books, human-animal bond, and cozy mysteries under the name of Melanie Snow. Her books are located on Amazon.com and you can also visit her at CenterforPetLossGrief.com